Police filming English streets in 1935

This film illustrates an early example of technologically-mediated visual surveillance: the use of cine cameras by the British police in 1935 in the English town of Chesterfield in an operation to crack down on illegal street betting. The film accompanies an article by Chris Williams in Surveillance & Society 6(1) which explains what was going on and why… You can read the abstract or the full article Police filming English streets in 1935: the limits of mediated identification(Chris A Williams, James Patterson, James Taylor).

Chris A Williams, James Patterson, James Taylor

Dear Mr Pepsident:

MR PEPSIdent

Dear Mr President‘ is PEPSI’s advert (thought and thus, it would be so much cooler if it was Mr PEPSIdent); you are suppose to answer this question: ‘what would you say to the man who is about to refresh America?’. PEPSI then becomes the channel, the messenger, the carrier, the pigeon, the media between the audience and the target. Very clever. An banking on one of the most widely liked presidents on the history of the United States of NorthAmerica, that is also clever. You can see there loads of videos and short textual messages from famous and the rest of us. 

Its all here.

A Photographic Share Economy?

President and First Lady Obama at the Inaugural Youth Ball

At the Inaugural Youth Ball, the new President of the United States of (North) America and the First Lady Obama salute the crowd.


What an amazing image!
While the event is happening, we the audience indulge in its consumption by recording it, rather than experiencing the event itself. We engage the media, the channel, the interface, and not the message. This image speaks volumes about how we experience reality, about our relation with the image world, and about ownership. I saw it recently on Coscientious (through TomorrowMuseum, Venture Beat, Ekstasis, Constant Siege). Although we have seem similar images or may have even experience this ourselves, specially during concerts, perhaps because of the event, Obama’s new presidency celebrations, it may have reached global values.

It is obvious that such mass-recorded events could not have taken place last century, without the advent of new technologies that could facilitate both the mass production and the mass distribution of the photographic apparatus. But it was bound to happen, as more and more people become owners of digital cameras.

There is a double intrinsic idea in the photographic act: not only you think it is worth recording, but it is also worth owning. The image Im taking is precious both because I was there and it was important, and because I desire to be the owner of that document.

A while ago I read about Kevin Kelly’s essay Better Than Owning, that arrived to me in a much shorter version in Boing Boing feed, that I read about again in Share Economy, and I think it is worth repeating here:

Very likely, in the near future, I won’t “own” any music, or books, or movies. Instead I will have immediate access to all music, all books, all movies using an always-on service, via a subscription fee or tax. I won’t buy – as in make a decision to own — any individual music or books because I can simply request to see or hear them on demand from the stream of ALL. I may pay for them in bulk but I won’t own them. The request to enjoy a work is thus separated from the more complicated choice of whether I want to “own” it. I can consume a movie, music or book without having to decide or follow up on ownership.

For many people this type of instant universal access is better than owning. No responsibility of care, backing up, sorting, cataloging, cleaning, or storage. As they gain in public accessibility, books, music and movies are headed to become social goods even though they might not be paid by taxes. It’s not hard to imagine most other intangible goods becoming social goods as well. Games, education, and health info are also headed in that direction.

It is hard to chew a way forward in terms of a Photographic share economy, though while it seems excessive for mankind to record the same event with millions of cameras, we all want to have one, to take one. Maybe the issue is there, in the sharing. Or perhaps we have to relax and enjoy what we are experiencing rather than recording it (remember how we became slaves of our video-cameras in the 80’s?), is it then a matter of education? a cultural construct?

Demotix: a virtual agent for citizen journalists

Demotix is a citizen-journalism website and photo agency.
Imagine a community driven news agency that allows you to share your story, in photos or videos, and market it to the mainstream media. That is Demotix.

“Demotix was founded with two principles at its heart – the freedom of speech and the freedom to know. Its objective is nothing if not ambitious – to rescue journalism and promote free expression by connecting independent journalists with the traditional media.”

Basic, non-exclusive rights to your photos will sell for anything between $150 and $3,000 USD. Non-exclusive rights to your video: $500-1,000/minute. Exclusive rights: whatever we can get. And some photos and videos can go for $100,000s. In all cases, you get exactly 50% and you retain the copyright.

STOP SELLING STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY AND START SELLING YOUR TRUTH

Have a look at their showcase:

via Demotix

How I experienced Obama’s victory speech.

It was the 5th of November 2008

ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific.ABC, USTREAM, Election-Twitter and Twitterrific. 

It was a great night and one that change how news are experienced. I had on my Mac ABC news live, UStream, Twitter-election US, and Twitterrific. On my telly, I was swapping channels from CNN, RTE, Sky News, to FOX. But it was an amazing experience just being able to heard the voices of loads of people through Twitter, that had previously reported live the results from their own neighborhoods, cities and states. I think Twitter changed for ever how we experience ‘the event’, on real time and hyper-commented. 

 

Check this sites tonight

Is Obama President?Is Obama President Yet?
Is Obama President?Is Obama President Yet?
UPDATED:
Is Obama President? YES!Is Obama President? YES, Finally: YES!
Is Obama President?
Is Obama President Yet?

So now I wonder, how will I experience the Inauguration Speech? on Twitter and Current

Follow the Inauguration Speech, and make it yours


Head to Current and learn more: “Current & Twitter have teamed up again. We’re adding your real-time Twitter messages (“tweets”) over our live broadcast of Barack Obama’s Inauguration.”

Objectified

A peek at the upcoming design documentary “Objectified”, by Gary Hustwit, the director of “Helvetica”. The trailer features the voices of Jonathan Ive, Andrew Blauvelt, Marc Newson, and Karim Rashid. The song is “I Like Van Halen Because My Sister Says They Are Cool” by El Ten Eleven. 

Objectified premieres at film festivals and events worldwide starting this March, more info here:http://www.objectifiedfilm.com

About the film

Objectified is a feature-length independent documentary about industrial design. It’s a look at the creativity at work behind everything from toothbrushes to tech gadgets. It’s about the people who re-examine, re-evaluate and re-invent our manufactured environment on a daily basis. It’s about personal expression, identity, consumerism, and sustainability. It’s about our relationship to mass-produced objects and, by extension, the people who design them.

Through vérité footage and in-depth conversations, the film documents the creative processes of some of the world’s most influential designers, and looks at how the things they make impact our lives. What can we learn about who we are, and who we want to be, from the objects with which we surround ourselves?

Read director Gary Hustwit’s post about the film.