The Vision of the Other.

The Vision of the Other:
Modernity & the Photographed Face.

Horst P. HORST, Coco Chanel, 1937

KOWASA gallery presents “The Vision of the Other: Modernity and the Photographed Face”, a group show which attempts to define the way in which the human face was photographically constructed before its abolition by Postmodernism. The exhibition primarily offers a thorough insight into the history of portrait photography with a special emphasis on the shift of the portrait from being a mere “extension of the painted body” to being the photographic genre par excellence. At the same time it highlights the aesthetic and conceptual evolution of early portraiture from Pictorialism towards a modernist experimentation and subjectivity.

The exhibition gathers more than 70 black and white prints whose protagonists are Coco Chanel, Ernest Heminway, André Breton, Marc Chagall, Dalí, Josep Pla, Andy Warhol, Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, Jean-Paul Sartre, Marilyn Monroe and others. Among the more than 50 participant photographers appear such internationally renowned names as Nadar, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Doisneau, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Horst P. Horst, Edward Steichen, Josef Sudek, Arnold Newman, Man Ray; national photographers include Joan Colom, Francesc Català-Roca, Xavier Miserachs and Alberto Schommer.

Jacques-Henri LARTIGUE, Renée Perle, 1930-32

Throughout the exhibition ATELIERETAGUARDIA will be organizing portrait sessions using the technique of wet-plate collodion, one of the most emblematic photographic processes of the 19th century. ATELIERETAGUARDIA heliografía contemporánea is a platform for the study and practice of 19th century photographic technology.

The advent of photography contributed to the re-evaluation of portrait art in regard to painting as, in the words of Samuel Morse, an “improved Rembrandt”. Obtained through processes which required a long exposure and which resulted in many imperfections, the first portraits in the 19th century often suggested an attack on the vanity of their subjects. Following this, it is hardly surprising that the increasing aesthetic demands of the time very soon resulted in an army of portraits-makers at the service of retouching mastery. If the conviction that photography “robbed” the soul reigned in the 19th century, in the 20th century photography would become the soul’s mirror. Under the impact of this idea which made a deep impression on the popular imagination, portrait photography was conferred the mission of capturing with sophistication the historic aura, whilst reflecting in its discourse the predominant social and cultural stereotypes.

Yousuf Karsh, Alfred Hitchcock, 1960

The poses of introspection, the overacting of the bourgeois fetishes and a harmonious representation of all the parts of the body constitute to some of the visual characteristics of this orthodox rhetoric of the portrait. Whereas the direct photographic take was supposed to provide sufficient data for recognizing oneself, the portrait -the supposed door to the soul- paradoxically ended up violating this principle by prioritizing a visual vocabulary that flaunted the pertinence of the individual into a social class.

Pictorialism (late 19th century-early 20th) came to embody this ideology with its hymn to the inner being and its constant flirt with painting. Even if the status of the individual as agent of a social hierarchy was now fading in favour of a spiritual reflection that projected the emotional qualities of the person depicted, this did not mean to say that the Pictorialists were infringing upon the rules of the game -to the contrary, the deal between the socially imagined and the final representation was still preserved. This pictorialist concept remained firmly rooted in fine-art photography portraiture throughout the 20th century despite its ongoing ruptures and changes. Even the critical accomplishments of the European avant-gardes, which were widely popularized during the thirties and the post-war era, were adopted by portrait photography so as to construct a much more dynamic, persuasive discourse whose variants continued to fortify the mythologies and popular narratives of the time. Among the most characteristic cases is the portraiture of celebrities and actresses, whereby face and body were shaped in accordance to the myth. Likewise, the portraits of public personalities -politicians and artists-are enveloped by means of obsequious poses that associate them irrevocably with their respective names. Here, more than ever, the face turns into a public affair.

In the meantime, with the introduction of hand-held cameras, the naturalization of poses and snapshot culture were gaining terrain.

In the twenties, the avant-gardes denounced the mystic ambition of discovering what lay behind the face, and instead began to pursue aesthetic experimentation. In this new way of looking, according to which, in the words of László Moholy-Nagy, “each pore, wrinkle or freckle has its importance”, the goals were quite distinct: the time had arrived to become definitively divorced from painting, to celebrate the inherent properties of photography -the camera eye, the negative and the positive. It was time to push aside the classist mise-en-scène and focus on a much more abstract and geometric representation of the external world. This experimentation with the photographic medium included over-exposures, formalism, special angles, close-up, and photomontage.

Another important element of modernist portraiture in its most mature phase is the insertion of psychoanalysis and Freudian theories in its visual discourse. If the orthodox portrait propagated the unity of identity, these theories, first adopted by the Surrealists and the artistic circles linked to them, reinvented the face as something superficial, planting evidence for the duality between the person and their “persona”, namely the masquerade one constructs for others -that is to say the polarization between the ego, the super-ego and the eradicated social image.

For its part, direct photography was expressing its scepticism before the subject, under the decisive influence of the Marxist theories which advocated the consciousness of a social being. The debate became intensified after the second-world war. Portrait photography came out of the studio for good, capturing its subjects in poses of apparent informality within their natural environments -the artist in his studio, the composer beside his piano, the writer among his books, and above all, the photographer with his camera. Faces captured with carelessness demystified the system and the established social imagery by establishing an iconology of social synecdoche. Snapshot and candid street photography broke the complicity among the sitter and the photographer, and dynamized the traditional conception of the portrait. The problem now shifted to what Barthes has described as the battle of two identities with distinct domains: on the one hand, there is the photographer-voyeur, and on the other the photographed subject which elaborates its social masquerade to back up its image. In this new age, rather than being the “mirrors of the soul” of the sitters, portraits reflected the personality of the photographer. This ongoing rupture of the portrait as a unity accepted ambiguity and humour at the time of representation. The modernist faith concerning myth still persisted, although, at this time it was not projected by the external world but instead, by the author and his camera. It would not be long before the gaze turned its back on it. In the early seventies, the definitive “rupture of the mirror” would cause the final abolition of both implicated parts, the sitter and the “auteur” behind the camera.

Joakim Eskildsen: The Roma Journeys.

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I saw ‘The Roma Journeys’ exhibition in Winterthur’s FotoMuseum last Saturday. What an amazing piece of work. I totally recommend you, if you really like Photography and know what Photography is for, to check the full extent of his work. It is a pleasure and a refreshing experience to see photographers engaging in other matters than self-endulgement. In his own words:

“Between 2000 and 2006 I together with writer Cia Rinne undertook travels in seven different countries with a view to gaining an insight into the life of the Roma and the conditions they face. We always tried to spend a considerable length of time among the people whom we wanted to learn about and, if possible, to live with them for a while.
It was our own interest that initially took us to the Roma streets in Hevesaranyos in northeast Hungary, where we spent four months at the home of Magda, an elderly Roma. The other journeys to Romania, India and our travels in Finland came about through personal contact, while in Greece and Russia we were initially assisted by human rights organizations and in France by the Centre de recherches tsiganes in Paris.
These Roma journeys were by no means meticulously planned, and instead the product of a number of coincidences that enabled us to come into contact with the Roma. We endeavored to communicate directly with them. In most countries this was possible, and while in Russia and India we were accompanied on our travels, and thus had willing assistance.
We have frequently been asked what had triggered our interest in the Roma, but we were unable to provide a definitive, let alone exhaustive answer. What is certain is that once we hard started we were unable to simply stop continuing with the project. The more we found out about the Roma and got to know them, the more our interest in and liking for them grew.
In keeping with the different countries traveled, the photographic body of work is divided into seven series, the sequence of which roughly corresponds to the chronology of our journeys.”

via joakimeskildsen.com

6×6 Fragments of European Photography

FOTOFESTIWAL, Lodz, Poland, May 7th – 31st, 2009

From their site: “Even people who deal with photography on a daily basis find it difficult to choose what is important and worth attention from the profusion of “photographic works” of the last years. It is not easy to follow every novelty, change, interesting names and ideas. Slideshows and curator presentations are an attempt to update the recent changes and trends in the European photography.

We invited curators from six countries to help us create this programme. Each of them was asked to make a subjective choice of artists and photo projects that best reflect the character and condition of current photography of a given country.

The presentations is comprised of two parts. The first part consists of lectures during which the curators will present their latest photo discoveries and will try to explain their choice of projects. The second part consists of night slideshows with music prepared especially for the Fotofestiwal.”

CURATORS:

Austria Martin Breindl
France Jim Casper
GreeceNina Kassianou
IrelandPeggy Sue Amison
ItalyAlessandra  Capodacqua
PolandTomasz Ferenc

* * *

AUSTRIA

Curator: Martin Breindl
FLUSS
– Society for the Promotion of Photo and Media Art, Wolkersdorf, Austria

Martin Breindl, born 1963 in Vienna, Austria, is a media artist, theoretician and curator. He is the founder of alien productions (in collaboration with Andrea Sodomka, Norbert Math and August Black), an artists’ network dealing with new technology and media. He works in the fields of media performance, installation, net art, radio art, sound art, video art and visual arts. Since 2001, he has been one of the curators of FLUSS – society for the promotion of photo and media art, based in Wolkersdorf, Austria; since 2005, he has also been a co-curator of the International Photographic Triennial Backlight.

SLIDESHOWS:
8th of May – Friday (08:30 pm – EC1, 1/3 Targowa St., Lodz )

Artists and Projects:
Sabine Bitter & Helmut Weber – Plugged In, Fenced Out
Eva Brunner-Szabo – Bandages I, III, VII
Robert F. Hammerstiel – Private Stories II & Alles in bester Ordnung IV
Sabine Maier – Commo-nice!
Herwig Turk – Agents

* * *

FRANCE

Curator: Jim Casper
Lens Culture
– photography and shared territories (online magazine)

Jim Casper is the editor and publisher of Lens Culture – an international online magazine celebrating contemporary photography, art, media, and world cultures. Each day, the site attracts between 5,000 and 6,000 unique visitors from more than 50 countries.

Jim also curates arts exhibitions, writes about photography and culture for magazines and books, lectures, reviews portfolios, coordinates events and workshops, collaborates in formal partnerships to promote and publicize important international photography events and conferences, and serves as an international artists’ agent.

SLIDESHOWS:
8th of May – Friday
08:30 pm – EC1, 1/3 Targowa St., Lodz

Artists and Projects:
Denis Darzacq – Hyper
JR – Women are Heroes
Eric Tabuchi – 26 Abandoned Gasoline Stations
Alexei Vassiliev – Troubled Moments
Guilaume Zuili – Fragments

* * *

GREECE

Curator: Nina Kassianou
Thessaloniki Museum of Photography, Greece

Phd in History of Photography. She is collaborating as an exhibition curator and photography book editor with the Museum of Photography in Thessaloniki. Permanently working as a curator for Gallery M55 in Athens which promotes work of Greek and European young photographers.

She has organized many individual and group exhibitions in Greece and in Europe. As a reviewer she has participated in many festivals in Europe. She is one of the contributors to the the 1st Cyclopedia of European Photography presenting the Greek part.

SLIDESHOWS:
8th of May – Friday
10:30 pm – Jazzga Club, 17 Piotrkowska St., Lodz (open air event)

Artists and Projects:

Athina Chroni – People – 3D photographs
Haris Kakarouhas – Square Icons
Evangelia Kranioti – Au moment X
Costas Ordolis – Bodies, Masks & Cities
Ioanna Ralli – Archetypes of the Feminine

* * *

IRELAND

Peggy Sue Amison
Sirius Arts Centre, Cobh, Co. Cork, Ireland

In her position as Artistic Director at Sirius Arts Centre in Ireland for over 8 years, Peggy Sue Amison has curated numerous photographic and other visual arts exhibitions with artists from around the world. She also facilitates the development of new works through the international artist-in-residency programme at Sirius, often partnering artists and organisations together on projects.

A photographic artist herself, Peggy has also written critical essays and reviews for numerous photographic publications internationally and serves as a reviewer at meeting places for photographers at different photographic festivals. An important part of her work at Sirius is focused on raising the level of discourse about photography in Ireland through all of the above.

POKAZY SLAJDÓW:
9th of May – Saturday
09:00 pm – Jazzga Club, 17 Piotrkowska St., Lodz (open air event)

Artists and Projects:
Mark Curran – The Breathing Factory
David Farrell – Nè vicino Nè lontano. A Lugo // Neither Close, nor Far. Lugo
Seán Hillen – The Troubles
Jackie Nickerson – Faith
Eoin O’ Conaill – Common Place

* * *

ITALY

Curator: Alessandra Capodacqua
Fondazione Studio Marangoni – Center of Contemporary Photography in Florence

Alessandra Capodacqua has curated exhibitions in Italy and abroad, among others the Backlight Triennial Festival of Photography in Tampere, Finland. She has also been invited at portfolio reviews such as Photolucida – Critical Mass (USA); Mission Jeunes Artistes, Toulouse (France); Photo Triennale Hamburg (Germany).

She teaches photography at New York University in Florence, and creative photography – including pinhole and toy cameras, alternative printing techniques. Currently lives and works in Florence.

SLIDESHOWS:
8th of May – Friday
10:30 pm – Jazzga Club, 17 Piotrkowska St., Lodz (open air event)

Artists and Projects:

Fabio Barile – Among
Alessandro Destro – Suspect Behaviour
Simone Donati – Crimean Tatars, Return to the Motherland
Silvia Noferi – Hôtel Rêverie
Elisabetta Senesi – Handle With Care

* * *

POLAND

Curator: Tomasz Ferenc
Department of Sociology of Culture, University of Lodz, Poland

Tomasz Ferenc (1973), member of Fundation of Visual Education in Lodz. Works as a academic teacher and researcher at the University of Lodz (Department of Sociology, Chair Sociology of Art). His PhD thesis ware devoted to social aspect of using and understanding photography. His main subject is sociology of photography and visual anthropology. He is interested in possibilities of using photography during research process.

He has edited and co-edited five books focused on different aspects of this medium (two of them will be printed this year). He cooperates with some photo magazines in Poland and publishes scientific and popular articles. Now he is more involved in practice of photography than in theory, as it has been for many years. With some others photographers he works on project devoted to oppressive aspects of architecture.

SLIDESHOWS:
9th of May – Saturday
09:00 pm – Jazzga Club, 17 Piotrkowska St., Lodz (open air event)

Artists:
Anita Andrzejewska – Nur-e jan
Konrad Grajner – 44 War-schau
Magdalena Kmiecik – Space Between
Michal Przezdzik – Still Life
Dominika Truszczynska – Glimpses of Infinity

* * *

via Fotofestiwal

The Prince’s Rainforests Project and Sony World Photography Awards 2009

he Prince’s Rainforests Project and Sony World Photography Awards 2009 

  • Deadline for amateur submissions extended to 28 February 2009
  • Final call for professional photographers

Budding amateur environmental photographers now have until 28 February 2009 to submit their work to The Prince’s Rainforests Project (PRP) Award, a major new initiative for the 2009 Sony World Photography Awards. 

A selection of the best images by amateur photographers will be displayed in Cannes during the Sony World Photography Awards in April 2009, and these images will be used by The Prince’s Rainforests Project and Sony on various initiatives throughout the year to help communicate this important message.

Photographic entries are judged by a panel of experts including: Stuart Franklin, photographer and President of Magnum (UK); John Sauven, Director of Greenpeace (UK); Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier, Executive Director, International League of Conservation Photographers (USA); Helena Christensen, model and photographer (Denmark); Roberto Smeraldi, Director and Founder of Friends of the Earth – Brazilian Amazonia (Brazil); David de Rothschild, environmentalist and explorer (UK), and Kathy Moran¸ Senior Picture Editor of Natural History at Natural Geographic Magazine (USA).

This distinctive panel will be chaired by renowned British photographer and author, Tom Stoddart.

In his appeal for entries to the awards judge David de Rothschild commented “Creative expression through photography is a very powerful tool. It not only has the ability to present the facts and tell stories, but it has the capacity to give insights that can turn reflection into change. The Sony/PRP Awards are an ideal platform to harness creativity to implement change and in turn inspire, educate and engage individuals, communities and industry to take positive action for our planet.”

Fellow judge Roberto Smeraldi added “While we usually quote figures and studies to show how critical the forest is for our lives, it is crucial that we actually also show the link between the forest, the people and everyday’s life. Prince Charles’ initiative offers to us, in Brazil, a unique opportunity to demonstrate why action is dramatically required and why we have an amazing comparative advantage in this field.”

The professional Sony/PRP Award winner will be announced on 3 February 2009 and the amateur photographers selected to have their work exhibited in Cannes will be informed in March 2009.

Further information about the Sony World Photography Awards and details of how to enter the competition can be found at www.worldphotographyawards.org

Sony World Photography Awards

The Sony World Photography Awards (WPA), launched in 2007, lend a global platform for the photographic industry and community. Through a variety of international programmes including the week-long Festival @ The Sony World Photography Awards, the launch of an online magazine and a gallery, an international student programme and a touring exhibition, the WPA will continue to discover new talent and create avenues  through  which to reward photographers with the support and expertise of industry professionals. The winner of L’Iris D’Or – the best photograph for both the amateur and the professional awards – will be announced at the awards ceremony in Cannes on 16 April 2009.

The WPA website – www.worldphotographyawards.org now features an online magazine and gallery. It also includes comprehensive information about the awards, the categories, a current list of World Photographic Academy members, and key dates. Images from the 2008 awards are available via the website’s press centre.

The Prince’s Rainforests Project

The PRP consists of a team of 20 working out of St. James’s Palace who intend to leverage the convening power of The Prince of Wales to work with bodies ranging from Governments, international business and NGOs to the rainforest nations themselves and the people who depend on these forests for their livelihoods.

PRP’s objectives are to find a way to:
– Establish true economic values for the services provided by the rainforests;
– Identify possible sources of finance to pay for those services; and
– Develop efficient and equitable transfer mechanisms, alongside the necessary technical and institutional capabilities that may be required, to ensure that the funds aimed at conserving rainforests also contribute to improving local people’s long-term livelihoods
More about the PRP in www.princesrainforestsproject.org

The Gallery of Photography Artist’s Award

The Gallery of Photography

THE GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHY ARTIST’S AWARD, now in its 7th year, offers exciting opportunities for an artist of any age who has a significant lens-based project or body of work underway. The winner receives:

• A solo exhibition in the Gallery of Photography in 2010 or later.

• €5,000 towards the exhibition and/or publication.

• Access to the Gallery of Photography’s Artist’s Digital Studio – high-spec Mac, scanner, exhibition quality printer; and to the Gallery of Photography’s Darkrooms.

• Technical assistance with all aspects of exhibition production.

• Ongoing mentoring, curatorial feedback and publishing expertise.

• A full colour editorial feature in The Irish Arts Review, media partner for the Award.

Entry Conditions & Requirements:

1. Entry is open to artists of any age.

2. Artists must be either resident in Ireland (32 counties); or Irish citizens; or show evidence of a longstanding involvement or connection with Irish culture, including the diaspora.

Entries should consist of:

1. A maximum of 8 work prints no larger than A4 from the work-in-progress, or, if the project is still in inception, 8 prints representative of a previous project which was in the opinion of the artist, similar in scope and ambition. Please note: work is only accepted on CD/DVD if the proposed project takes a non print-based form, eg projected DVD, web project etc.

2. A paragraph outlining the project’s subject/theme/treatment.

3. A paragraph outlining the planned schedule for completion of the project.

4. An up to date CV, including email address.

5. A stamped, self-addressed envelope for return of prints/materials if required.

6. An entry fee of €10 (cheque, postal order payable “Gallery of Photography” or by paypal).

DEADLINE: 5pm MONDAY MARCH 9th 2009

via The Gallery of Photography Dublin

About a couple of paintings.

Eichwald, Robert Zünd, 1859. Kunsthause Zürich

Eichwald, Robert Zünd, 1859. Kunsthause Zürich

On your screen, this image may look like just a photo of a forest, and depending on your interest in ‘Nature’, trekking, or even photography, you may or may not spend more than a few seconds gazing at the image. But the original is a 77.7 x 104.2 cm painting – yes, a painting – quite impressive, so delicately painted, and demonstrating such a great study of light that I kept saying to myself ‘no way, impossible!’. Well, there it was, hanging in the Kunsthause Zürich, part of the Swiss Realism collection. While it is just a painting of a forest, a traditional realist landscape motive, there is something about this painting, when you are there in front of it, in a museum, suddenly observing no more than a few trees, ferns… and the light. And you start to wonder why that composition and not other, why didn’t he turn around and looked for some open in the forest to show distant lands, or why choosing those trees and no others. All this, supposing he didn’t painted the subject by memory at his studio. By now I don’t know much about this painting, although I can be sure that it must have been an exercise in light.

It reminded me of a photograph by Maria de la Iglesia, of a similar composition, taken in the Ireland’s Wicklow mountains, somewhere deep in the Devil’s Glen. I am attracted to the colours, the light, the textures, and I cant help to look for symmetry and parallelisms in the trees, as if I needed to justify the image itself in order to accept that it has been presented to me. As in the case of Zünd’s Eichwald, the ultimate reason to present such image has to be something like: “Look; stop for a while if you care, and look carefully, as I did. What do you see?”. The answer is Light. And then it becomes Realism.

Forest, Maria de la Iglesia, 2006.

Forest, Maria de la Iglesia, 2006.

Looking across the hall from Zünd’s painting, there is another very impressive painting, this time by Rudolf Koller, Die Schwester des Künstlers. Koller also belongs to the Swiss Realism. What really fascinates me about the painting is the light, again. The image here is not of great quality, hard to find a good one, but you can see how he chose to hide her face by placing her a step forward from, most likely, the studio’s skylight, and leaning her head forward. There is a warn light coming from the right, from outside the image, perhaps a brass or copper plate? And then there is the encoded body language, one hand pointing down, the other one holding the handkerchief, …and the unfinished background. All in a golden frame with rounded inner corners (one of the best frames I’ve ever seen). This is a beautiful photo-carte de visite!

Die Schwester des Künstlers, Rudolf Koller, late 1800s.

Die Schwester des Künstlers, Rudolf Koller, late 1800s.

The ‘Sister of the Artists’ is hung in my favorite room in the whole Kunsthause building, and hexagonal room, covered in dark oak wooden panels, with a circular skylight keeping it bright, and a beautiful and simple patterned carpet. Perhaps, soon, I can post an image of this room here.

ILLUSTRATIVE ZURICH 2008

From October 17th to October 26th ILLUSTRATIVE´s 4th forum of illustrative an graphic arts will take place in the Zurich Messehallen. Conceived in 2006 by Pascal Johanssen and Katja Kleiss in Berlin, ILLUSTRATIVE is an annual forum, and the only one of it´s kind worldwide that presents the latest inclinations which run the gamut of illustrative and graphic art in one exhibition.
Illustrative art is fresh, humorous, and easily accessible: the scope of work displayed in ILLUSTRATIVE ranges from psychedelic wall paintings, to erotic neon pop art, while presenting monumental town views, as well as quasi photo-realistic drawings. The special sensitivity to artistic quality and a mix of analogue and digital techniques give a special progressiveness to the illustrative arts. This has decisively influenced the development of contemporary art for some time now.
The latest ILLUSTRATIVE has expanded in comparison to previous years. It now includes a central exhibition, section exhibitions, temporary workshops, and a forum for presentations and conferences.

A list of the artists exhibiting.

Here’s your ticket, and please, follow the line.

Ireland at the European Month of Photography 2008

‘Ireland. An Insiders View’ gives an impression of up-and-coming Irish photographic talent.
In the last few years unprecedented changes have come about in Ireland. The country has transformed itself into a modern, competitive and multi-faceted nation.
The cultural landscape of the country, in particular, has undergone important changes. Increased subsidies and the development of photography courses have brought forth a new generation of critical and informed graduates. These talented photographers play a key role in the investigation of contemporary questions within Irish culture. The works exhibited here reflect the wide range of issues in a phase of Ireland’s self-discovery.

Ireland [an insider’s view] presents a brief overview of emerging Irish photographic talent.

In recent years Ireland has undergone an unprecedented process of change. The country has developed from an inward-looking society into a modern, competitive, diverse and wealthy nation.

In particular the cultural landscape of the country has undergone significant changes. Increased funding for the arts and the emergence of photography degree programmes have created a new generation of critically informed photography graduates. The emerging Irish photographic talent is playing a key role in the investigation of contemporary issues within Irish culture.

The works selected here reflect a diversity of concerns as Ireland struggles to make sense of itself: the new generation of young ‘post-conflict’ northern Irish Diaspora: the effects of the ‘Celtic Tiger’ boom on the landscape; suburbanisation of the rural landscape; the hedonistic night life of the capital city. The images selected reflect a brief account of these insiders’ views.

The 12 artists are: Kim Cunningham, Tadhg Devlin, Kevin Fox, Ben Geoghegan, Angel Gonzalez, Louise Maher, Eoin O’Conaill, Mandy O’Neill, Fred O’Reilly, Anna Rackard, Darlene Shannon, Ruby Wallis.

Ireland [an insider’s view] is curated by Darragh Shanahan for the Gallery of Photography, Dublin.

This project is supported by Culture Ireland – promoting the arts abroad.